A BROKEN STICK IS AN EXTREMELY RARE EVENT, AT LEAST IF THAT STICK IS A DITA.

Caring for Your Stick and Shoes
The illustration on the left is not of a broken or defective stick. It happens to be an old photo of Teun de Nooijer's Dita Giga #14. Teun is the two-time FIH player of the year. The photograph demonstrates what a well used stick looks like. Note the "sweet spot" and how the paint is worn off. This is what you want your stick to look: used like a genius.

Note as well how Teun has wrapped the lower portion of the shaft. Not only does this protect the shaft, it makes it easier to intercept and control balls with the shaft.

If you want to keep your stick shiny and new looking, go to an automotive supply store and get a tube or tiny bottle of touch up paint. Bring your stick with you to match the color. (I would recommend "DUPLI-Color"tm SCRATCH-FIX.)

Although rare, defective workmanship does sometimes occur. Dita will repair or replace your stick if it is broken during normal play, within three months of purchase. We warranty Dita sticks purchased from authorized Dita retailers in the USA.


  • MAINTAIN YOUR SHOES DAILY
    MAINTAIN YOUR SHOES DAILY
    Simple Ways to Care for Your Shoes

    Few sports put such a range of stresses upon shoes as field hockey. The life expectancy of a pair of turf shoes can be very short, especially if not cared for daily.

    Always let your shoes air-dry. Your feet perspire. Moisture can collect in the seams and below the insole. Our insoles are easily removed for drying. Flip the insoles upside down. If moisture is left in the shoe, bacteria can grow and weaken the junction between the uppers and sole. The constant starting and stopping in a pair of turf shoes already puts stress between the uppers and sole.

    NEVER LEAVE YOUR SHOES IN A CLOSED BAG.

    The laces and insoles are designed to be replaced. A fresh insole can make you feel like you have new shoes.

    When putting on your shoes, always loosen your shoelaces first to allow you to step into the shoe.

    Make sure that you loosen your shoelaces when taking your shoes off. Use your hands to take your shoe off. This prevents you from damaging the back of the shoe.
  • TAPE  THE SHAFT OF YOUR STICK
    TAPE THE SHAFT OF YOUR STICK


    Athletic tape, aka medical or hockey tape, can be found in a variety of colors in a 1.5" wide roll. It's sold at stores near the band-aids, at hockey events and in some sporting goods stores that sell field hockey sticks. TIP - add it to your online cart if you are making a large purchase to avoid shipping costs that are higher than the tape.

    TAPING METHODS:

    Many players want to protect a stick from the impact of other players sticks, known as hacking. Tape the lower shaft by using a single strip of tape 3"-4" long on the top edge and another on the bottom edge. Start just above the head, or hook, align the 2 strips to meet in the center of the shaft and roll around to the edges. Try to avoid an overlap in the center. Replace as needed.

    Advanced players use the tape as a brake when making a stop. The friction of the cloth tape, when in contact with a spinning ball, slows or stops the spin and allows a more accurate hit. Depending on your stopping style, use from 4"-8" of tape and start just above the head and press it along the center of the shaft.

  • KEEP YOUR STICK FROM LOOKING LIKE THIS
    KEEP YOUR STICK FROM LOOKING LIKE THIS


    Your New Composite Should Last A Good Long Time

    A Composite stick is made to hit field hockey balls, nothing else. Don't hit stones, rocks, other player's sticks (that's called hacking), or anything hard. Why? Because it will cause your stick to chip. That will make it look ugly. I know you don't want an ugly stick or you wouldn't have selected such a beauty.

    Play on grass or turf, not on dirt, in the street, on a textured tennis court, in the parking lot, or any abrasive surface. It will grind down your stick and destroy it in no time at all!